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Protecting a Rights agenda, Democracies, and Confronting Climate Change, Our Generational Responsibility


Democracy Index

Democracy & Environment: A Generational Challenge
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democracy_Index


The Democracy Index is an index compiled by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), the research division of the Economist Group, a UK-based private company which publishes the weekly newspaper The Economist. Akin to a Human Development Index but centrally concerned with political institutions and freedoms, the index attempts to measure the state of democracy in 167 countries and territories, of which 166 are sovereign states and 164 are UN member states.

The index is based on 60 indicators grouped in five different categories, measuring pluralism, civil liberties and political culture. In addition to a numeric score and a ranking, the index categorizes each country into one of four regime types: full democracies, flawed democracies, hybrid regimes, and authoritarian regimes. The Economist has published reports with updated versions of the Democracy Index for 2006, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, and 2021. (The Democracy index studies were reported every two years initially, the first report was published in 2006, then in 2008 and 2010. From 2010 the index became annual.)


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GreenPolicy360 | Country Search


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World Map / Countries & Regions


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Green Best Practices


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GreenPolicy360

Countries Globally

Including Climate Plans submitted in December 2015 in Paris at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)


Climate Plans Nation-by-Nation Act to Confront the Climate Crisis


INDCs (2015-2016)

Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs)


NDCs (2021-2022)


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Review country-by-country environmental data, green issues and open source citations.

We invite you to highlight, add and share examples of green best practices in your country.


Review Your Nation's Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (Your Individual Nation's Climate Action Plans)


Countries Signing Climate Action Plans (as of 2016)

Paris Agreement Signatures



United Nations - National Climate Plans Registry



Climate Analysis Indicators Tools (CAIT)


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Climate Watch Pathways

Via World Resources Institute

(2022)

Data Lab - https://www.wri.org/data/data-lab

Data Platforms - https://www.wri.org/data/data-platforms

Open Data Portal - https://datasets.wri.org/ - https://datasets.wri.org/dataset

Resource Library - https://www.wri.org/resources/type/data-52

Permissions & Licensing - https://www.climatewatchdata.org/about/permissions


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CLIMATE ACTION TRACKER


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INDC FACTSHEETS (2015 - 2016)

Comprehensive overview of submitted INDCs with quantification where possible.

In cooperation with the PRIMAP group at Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.


COMPARISON OF INDCS

Via the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions


INDC CLIMATE ACTION PLANS


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International Environmental Law: A Body of Laws and Regulations in the Process of Development

Environmental Laws @GreenPolicy360 -- https://www.greenpolicy360.net/w/Category:Environmental_Laws


GreenPolicy360 Siterunner: In the early years of the modern environmental movement, a conscious effort was made to construct a foundation of environmental laws and regulations on which a multi-year environmental protection framework could be built. Your GreenPolicy360 founder was one of those who believed in this constructive paradigm, using model legislation that could be locally developed, often in our state of California, then shared, 'exported' as we used to say, 'to the Feds' for adoption at the national level. The history here provides an ongoing modus operandi from the 60s and 70s until now as we deal with the pressing local, national, and international/global environmental threats and crises. We, at GreenPolicy360, call this "green best practices". Best practices is a model for sharing, networking, building on success and action. Templates and models, best practices made openly available, are our plans for having multiplier effects -- and it is our ongoing mission. A strong and resilient legal foundation and framework of environmental laws is an essential part of our overall work. We encourage you to join in as citizens of every nation, within your multiple and diverse legal systems and, we must add, as planet citizens. It is time for concerted planet citizen action.


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Climate-Related Laws/Statutes, Ordinances, Regulations, Rules | Law Making & Rules Making

GreenLaw360.com - Climate Plans Enforcement (Climpe.com database in dev)
GreenLaw360.com - Climate Plans Enforcement (Introduction/Resources)


Environmental Law 360 - @GreenPolicy360
Climate Change Laws Around the World
Climate Change Laws via Grantham Institute (Current)
Trends in Climate Change Legislation (2017)


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Climate Law / Legal Resources

World Commission on Environmental Law

IUCN Global Environmental Law Network


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Global Environmental Law via Cambridge U


Environmental Rule of Law: First Global Report - UN / UN Environment Programms - 2019

"Weak enforcement to be a global trend"


The Difficulties of Enforcing Global Environmental Law via Georgetown Law Review


Environmental Law - an Overview via Duke Law

Guide providing an overview of federal, North Carolina-specific, and international environmental law sources. For additional sources, including different state materials, researchers may wish to consult other relevant research guides and portals such as Vermont Law School's Environmental Law Research Resources, and/or the Environmental Law guide prepared by Lewis & Clark Law School's Paul L. Boley Law Library


International Environmental Law via the American Bar Association

Profound environmental changes caused by the increasing scale of human activity have led many observers to conclude that the planet has entered the “Anthropocene”—a geologic era signified by human impact on the biosphere. International environmental law is the set of agreements and principles that reflect the world's collective effort to manage our transition to the Anthropocene by resolving our most serious environmental problems, including climate change, ozone depletion and mass extinction of wildlife. More generally, international environmental law aims to achieve sustainable development—i.e., development that allows people to have a high quality of life today without sacrificing the quality of life of future generations. International environmental law is thus critical both for addressing specific environmental threats and for integrating long-term environmental protection into the global economy...



GlobalEnvironmentalLaw.com

The Global Environmental Law website was maintained by Prof. Robert Percival of the University of Maryland Carey School of Law.

The Global Environmental Law introduction to the online site captures the importance of sharing environmental laws -- 'transplanting law and regulatory policy innovations'.

"Globalization is transforming law and legal education. Nowhere is this more evident than in the field of environmental law. Environmental problems are viewed increasingly as transcending national borders and some—including global warming and climate change—pose significant risks to the very health of the planet. As a result, law has become a critical part in the efforts to combat global environmental problems and improve global living conditions."

"Legal systems across the globe are responding to environmental concerns in surprising new ways. Throughout the world, nations are upgrading their environmental standards. As they do so, they are frequently transplanting law and regulatory policy innovations derived from the experience of other countries, including nations with very different legal and cultural traditions."


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Global Environmental Law via Cambridge U


Environmental Rule of Law: First Global Report - UN / UN Environment Programms - 2019

"Weak enforcement to be a global trend"


The Difficulties of Enforcing Global Environmental Law via Georgetown Law Review


Environmental Law - an Overview via Duke Law

Guide providing an overview of federal, North Carolina-specific, and international environmental law sources. For additional sources, including different state materials, researchers may wish to consult other relevant research guides and portals such as Vermont Law School's Environmental Law Research Resources, and/or the Environmental Law guide prepared by Lewis & Clark Law School's Paul L. Boley Law Library


International Environmental Law via the American Bar Association

Profound environmental changes caused by the increasing scale of human activity have led many observers to conclude that the planet has entered the “Anthropocene”—a geologic era signified by human impact on the biosphere. International environmental law is the set of agreements and principles that reflect the world's collective effort to manage our transition to the Anthropocene by resolving our most serious environmental problems, including climate change, ozone depletion and mass extinction of wildlife. More generally, international environmental law aims to achieve sustainable development—i.e., development that allows people to have a high quality of life today without sacrificing the quality of life of future generations. International environmental law is thus critical both for addressing specific environmental threats and for integrating long-term environmental protection into the global economy...


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Visit the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law

IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) Academy of Environmental Law

The Academy is a consortium of educators from 214 academic institutions in 60 countries dedicated to improving the teaching, development and implementation of environmental law…


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Climate Change Demands International Action


Climate Refugees, Climate-Related Migrants

By 2050 over one billion people are at threat of being displaced

Drought, war, civil violence, economic disruption -- the costs of climate change are coming into view


Climate change is the defining crisis of our time and disaster displacement one of its most devastating consequences. Entire populations are already suffering the impacts, but vulnerable people living in some of the most fragile and conflict-affected countries are often disproportionately affected.

Refugees, internally displaced people (IDPs) and the stateless are on the frontlines of the climate emergency. Many are living in climate “hotspots”, where they typically lack the resources to adapt to an increasingly hostile environment.


The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has issues warnings, “Urgent steps needed now to mitigate climate impact on displaced people”. They continued: “The climate crisis is a human crisis. It is driving displacement and makes life harder for those already forced to flee.”



UN Global Refugees Social Media Accounts


(2020)

The Institute for Economics and Peace (2020): Over one billion people at threat of being displaced by 2050 due to environmental change, conflict and civil unrest.


The Ecological Threat Register (ETR), that measures the ecological threats countries are currently facing and provides projections to 2050. The report uniquely combines measures of resilience with the most comprehensive ecological data available, to shed light on the countries least likely to cope with extreme ecological shocks.

Key results

- 19 countries with the highest number of ecological threats are among the world's 40 least peaceful countries including Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Chad, India and Pakistan.

- Over one billion people live in 31 countries where the country's resilience is unlikely to sufficiently withstand the impact of ecological events by 2050, contributing to mass population displacement.

- Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa are the regions facing the largest number of ecological threats.

- By 2040, a total of 5.4 billion people – more than half of the world's projected population – will live in the 59 countries experiencing high or extreme water stress, including India and China.

- 3.5 billion people could suffer from food insecurity by 2050; which is an increase of 1.5 billion people from today.

- The lack of resilience in countries covered in the ETR will lead to worsening food insecurity and competition over resources, increasing civil unrest and mass displacement, exposing developed countries to increased influxes of refugees.


Visions of Humanity

(2021)

A composite index measuring the impact of ecological threats to countries made up of 5 qualitative indicators each weighed on a scale of 1-5. The higher the score, the more at risk the country.

The second edition of the Ecological Threat Report (ETR), which analyses 178 independent states and territories. Produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP), the report covers over 2,500 sub- national administrative units or 99.9% of the world’s population.



Institute for Economics and Peace


Climate Threat Horizon / Resources:

(2022)


United Nations Sixth IPCC Global Assessment (Part 3)


Climate refugee or climate migrant?

The terms refugee and migrant have been repeatedly used as political weapons by various political parties and governments, and the connotations of these labels can be contentious. The term ‘refugee’, according to the 1951 UN Convention Relating to the State of Refugees, is “someone who is unable or unwilling to return to their country of origin owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion”.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns that language is important in order to offer legal protection to individuals. They caution that:


“This is not just semantics—which definition becomes generally accepted will have very real implications for the obligations of the international community under international law. Forced climate migrants fall through the cracks of international refugee and immigration policy—and there is considerable resistance to the idea of expanding the definition of political refugees to incorporate climate ‘refugees’. The term ‘climate migrant’ can also be a loaded term, with the implication that the ‘pull’ of the destination rather than the ‘push’ of the original country is the primary factor for an individual to move.”

In its conclusion, they note that formal recognition is the critical first step.

“Meanwhile, large-scale migration is not taken into account in national adaptation strategies which tend to see migration as a ‘failure of adaptation’. The international community needs to acknowledge formally the predicament of forced climate migrants.”


The IPCC also highlight that numbers of displaced persons may be significantly under-counted owing to large-scale displacement within countries. “Given that the majority of people displaced by climate change will likely stay within their own borders, restricting the definition to those who cross international borders may seriously understate the extent of the problem”. National borders may seriously understate the extent of the problem”.

...with the lack of a secure definition under international law, climate migrants can fall between the cracks in asylum law, with no institution or country responsible for providing them with basic services. This, in turn, has the potential to be the biggest humanitarian disaster ever recorded – with hundreds of millions of people at risk of climate displacement.


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Democratic Governing: Facts Count

Global Fact-Checking Projects in Countries -- PolitiFact

"There are 96 fact-checking projects in 37 countries" (beginning with the original PolitiFact project from Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Florida)

http://www.poynter.org/2016/there-are-96-fact-checking-projects-in-37-countries-new-census-finds/396256/
http://reporterslab.org/fact-checking/
http://reporterslab.org/category/fact-checking/#article-1384
http://reporterslab.org/global-fact-checking-up-50-percent/


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Data/Facts/Measuring and Monitoring


You can manage only what you can measure Dr David Crisp, OCO-2, June 2014 m.jpg


United Nations / Tracking and Monitoring Key Data and Indices





Our World in Data -- https://ourworldindata.org/about/


Internet Users World-Region as of 2016.png


World Arable Land by Country (and Loss of Arable Land Over Time) - http://data.trendeconomy.com/industries/Arable_Land/

OECD / Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (See Environmental Data)


OECD Global Data.png


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World Population


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World Bank / Country Economic Data and FinSec Performance


World / Countries / Regions -- GDP / Gross Domestic Product


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Next-Gen GDP: Going Beyond Gross Domestic Product


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GreenPolicy360: We're working on it --- "Eco-nomics"

Think of 'quality of life' measurements as next-gen GDP+


Time for Smart Eco-nomics


(Intro from Eco-nomics @GreenPolicy360)


SJS - Steven J Schmidt / GreenPolicy360 Siterunner:

Our GreenPolicy360 vision is of a future that is healthy and focused on sustainability and quality of life, not simply classic economic metrics of GDP/GNP.

Our overall goals aim at sustainability and responsibility. Each generation faces the great challenges of its times. Our 21st century challenge is to develop a multi-dimensioned economics, one that does not exacerbate existential threats of climate change, and massive inequality, environmental destruction and loss of common purpose.

Our generation has to find news way going forward, a new vision, a 21st century vision and, toward this goal a new 'eco-nomics' is 'in-dev' at GreenPolicy360...


We are vested in protecting inalienable rights and offer a rights agenda based on a core set of values ensuring civil and minority rights, human rights, natural rights, women's rights.

We present a choice of opportunities, an array of green best practices that work to make a difference, a positive difference.


Now is the time for "finsec" action delivering real financial security, smart "eco-nomics", a 'quality of life' beyond GDP and with 'new definitions of national and global security'.


See GDP+ @GreenPolicy360


See New Definitions of National & Global Security @GreenPolicy360


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Subcategories

This category has the following 8 subcategories, out of 8 total.

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Pages in category "Countries"

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Media in category "Countries"

The following 103 files are in this category, out of 103 total.

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